Epstein Barr Virus

Doctor Motley - Epstein Barr VirusEpstein Barr Virus

It is estimated that 90% of the population has Epstein Barr Virus. It is a virus that is commonly transmitted through bodily fluids, known as “kissing disease”. Most individuals get EBV when they are young and don’t even know they have it. The concern with EBV is its ability to mimic other infections. It’s often associated or misdiagnosed as a common cold or allergy.

It’s main association is with mononucleosis , a condition with signs and symptoms such as:
  1. swollen lymph nodes 
  2. sore throat
  3. fever
  4. enlarged spleen
  5. rash
  6. CHRONIC FATIGUE THAT DOES NOT IMPROVE
  7. LOW CHRONIC THYROID HORMONE LEVELS

Testing for EBV is a simple blood test that scans for the protein coat remnants and antibodies associated with EBV. Every virus has a protein “coat”, just like a raincoat. When the virus dies off, the shell of the virus can float around in the blood. Since the shell is foreign, the body can create antibodies to the outer coating. Additionally if the virus is live then the body will produce antibodies toward the live virus itself. These components of the EBV can be tested with a VCA (viral capsid antigen) test, which checks for the protein coats of the virus. If you have:
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Low thyroid function
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Chronic food sensitivities/allergens
  • Waking up always tired
PLEASE GET THIS TEST DONE!

There are a few things I see test well for all the patients that come in with this condition:
  • Olive Leaf
  • Morinda-Noni Fruit
  • Chinese Coptis
  • Neem
  • Monolauric acid
  • L-lysine
  • Combinations of Vitamin A, D, E, K
You should not try to take these all at once. Research a qualified practitioner that can check if you can handle any of these supplements, herbs, or vitamins. Follow the advice of a licensed professional.

I begin with each patient researching if they have the ability to absorb vitamin D, which allows them to fight infections. This is all accomplished with the VDR. The vitamin D receptor sites on your cells nucleus. RESEARCH IT OUT!

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